Checking

Bank Checking & Savings Accounts

A transaction account, checking account, or demand deposit account is a deposit account held at a bank or other financial institution which is available to the account owner “on demand” and is available for frequent and immediate access by the account owner or to others as the account owner may direct. Access may be in a variety of ways, such as cash withdrawals, use of cheques and debit by electronic transfer. In economic terms, the funds held in a transaction account are regarded as liquid funds.

Transaction accounts are generally used for the business or personal convenience of the account holder. They normally do not earn any or a high interest and the financial institution that maintains the account commonly charges account maintenance or transaction fees to the account holder.

Saving accounts (UK: savings accounts) are accounts maintained by retail financial institutions that pay interestbut cannot be used directly as money in the narrow sense of a medium of exchange (for example, by writing acheque). These accounts let customers set aside a portion of their liquid assets while earning a monetary return. For the bank, money in a savings account may not be callable immediately and, in some jurisdictions, does not incur a reserve requirement. Cash in the bank’s vaults may thus be used, for example, to fund interest-payingloans.

The other major types of deposit account are the transactional account (usually known as a “checking” (US) or “current” (UK) account), money market account and time deposit.

Wading River

Wading River is a hamlet and census-designated place (CDP) in Suffolk CountyNew York, United States, on the North Shore of Long Island. As of the 2010 census, the CDP population was 7,719.[1] It is adjacent to Shoreham and shares a school district.

 

Most of Wading River lies within the Town of Riverhead, but a small portion is in the Town of Brookhaven. The name of the hamlet comes from the original Algonquian name for the area, Pauquaconsuk, meaning “the place where we wade for thick, round-shelled clams”. “Wading in the River” or Wading River was adopted by the first English colonists.